2018-2019 Graduate Catalog 
    
    Jul 06, 2022  
2018-2019 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are arranged alphabetically by the course prefix code letters, as listed here. For the purpose of brevity, course descriptions may consist of sentence fragments. Unless otherwise specified, graduate courses carry three credits. 

 

Criminal Justice

  
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    CJST 6658 - Leadership Issues in Policing


    Study of leadership within modern police organizations. Experiential exercises will be included. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6659 - Futures Research: Long-Range Planning and Forecasting in Criminal Justice


    An advanced examination of philosophical underpinnings of the discipline of Futures Research. The distinctions between conventional and long-range planning will be discussed. A multidisciplinary approach will be utilized. The student will learn to make use of several selective forecasting methodologies. The focus will be on the implementation of empirically derived strategies. The context will be justice system organizations. The purpose is to learn to effect meaningful social change. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6667 - Fire and Building Codes, Standards, and Practices


    The study of building and fire codes and regulations as they relate to prevention and incidence of structural fires. Contemporary building and fire codes and practices and their enforcement. Model building codes. Fire prevention and control through building design. Cross-listed with FIRE 6667 . 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6668 - Fire and Casualty Insurance Practices


    A study of financial risk and decision making. Insurance rate making and relation to risk and other factors. Insurance adjustment and economic factors that must be considered in fire and accident investigations.  Cross-listed with FIRE 6668 . 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6669 - Dynamics, Evaluation, and Prevention of Structural Fires


    A detailed analysis of the evolution of modern structures and the mechanical systems necessary to provide safety and comfort. The effect of the nature of structures and their mechanical systems on fire behavior. Structural basis and mechanical systems for fire protection and fire prevention. Cross-listed with FIRE 6669 . 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6670 - Selected Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6675 - Private Security Law


    A review and examination of currently applicable federal and state administrative, civil, criminal, and constitutional laws as they relate to the private security industry. The framework of the course will include sources of authority and common law. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6676 - Security Management Seminar


    Current problems, concerns, issues, and legislation affecting the private security industry as they relate and are of interest to the students and instructor. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6677 - Private Security in Modern Society


    An introduction to current thinking and problems relating to the private security system. The course will examine such issues as historical growth, role, mission, and future of the industry. Other topics will include professionalization and ethics in the field. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6678 - Homeland Security and the Threat of Terrorism


    This course is designed to familiarize students with the concept of homeland security from administrative, organizational, historical, and critical perspectives. The course will be taught in a critical thinking context rather than a training context. Specific emphasis will be placed on homeland security as a public safety paradigm and the implications of this paradigm on government agencies at the state and local level, overall national security, and public perception/opinion. A key component of this course is the presentation, analysis, and discussion of critical issues in homeland security. This is also an advanced course designed to familiarize students with the history and evolution of terrorism, the key concepts and theories of terrorism, the roles and responsibilities of counterterrorism agencies in the U.S., and the critical issues and controversies of the current “War on Terrorism.” Terrorism will be examined from a multidisciplinary perspective, and critical thinking by the students will be encouraged. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6680 - Research Issues in Cyberterrorism


    This course will consist of lectures, discussions, and empirical research into issues in cyberterrorism, its causes, its limitations, and its implications. It will focus largely on the thresholds and factors that drive terrorist groups into the information arena, the use of information technology by terrorist groups, and the emergence of new terrorist groups which use the information arena as their primary terrorism mechanism. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6684 - Fire Scene Reconstruction


    Application of the principles of reconstruction of the scene, including fire behavior, fire pattern analysis, ignition mechanisms, interpretation of human behavior, and fire scene analysis. Emphasis on scene documentation, origin and cause determination, preparation of reports, arson motives, rendering of advisory opinions to assist in the resolution of disputes affecting life and property.  Cross-listed with FIRE 6684 . 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6690 - Research Project I


    Individual guidance on a research endeavor.  1-3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6691 - Research Project II


    Prerequisite: CJST 6690 . Individual guidance on a research endeavor.  1-3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6693 - Criminal Justice Internship I


    The student’s formal educational development will be complemented by field placement experience in various criminal justice settings or agencies. Field experience will be supervised by designated agency and department personnel. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6694 - Criminal Justice Internship II


    Prerequisite: CJST 6693 .  The student’s formal educational development will be complemented by field placement experience in various criminal justice settings or agencies. Field experience will be supervised by designated agency and department personnel. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6695 - Independent Study


    A directed independent learning experience, the topic and format to be agreed upon by the student and supervising faculty. 1-3 credits. 0 credits.
  
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    CJST 6697 - Thesis I


    Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student’s progress toward the completion of the thesis. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6698 - Thesis II


    A continuation of Thesis I. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 6699 - Thesis III


    A continuation of Thesis II. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7701 - Seminar in Criminal Justice


    An analysis of contemporary issues in criminal justice, with an emphasis on evaluating connections between theory, research, and public policy. Students will review and assess existing scholarship pertaining to the study of crime and justice, while generating and critiquing ideas for their own research. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7707 - Psychological Applications CJ


    Prerequisite: CJST 6601  or consent of the instructor. This course will explore psychological theory and research in relation to specific problems in criminal justice. Assumptions underlying behavior analysis in criminal investigation and profiling, eyewitness testimony, jury selection, violence prediction, risk assessment, personnel screening, and children as victims will be examined. Students will be expected to develop an application in a specific area of expertise using class and textual content as a base. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7709 - Social and Structural Crime Models


    Prerequisite: CJST 6605 . This course is part of a package of courses focused on criminal behavior that are part of the Ph.D. in Criminal Justice. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7715 - Rational Models of Crime


    Prerequisite: CJST 6605 . A survey of rational choice theories of crime from sociology, psychology, economics, and political science perspectives. Topics include deterrence, routine opportunities theory, incapacitation, and conflict approaches to understanding crime and criminal behavior. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7719 - Psychology of Crime


    Prerequisites: CJST 6601 CJST 6605 .  A survey of psychological explanations of criminal behavior. Topics include psychoanalytic theories, trait theories, social learning, cognitive learning, biosocial theories, developmental theories of crime, and economic and social psychological theories of criminal behavior. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7722 - Advanced Quantitative Applications in Criminal Justice


    Prerequisite: CJST 6613  or the equivalent. An introduction to multivariate statistical techniques as applied in criminal justice research. Topics include regression analysis, discriminant analysis, factor analysis, manova, and multivariate significance tests. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7730 - Advanced Research Methods in Criminal Justice


    Prerequisite: CJST 6611  or the equivalent. Advanced examination and application of research design and methodologies in the study of crime and justice. Topics include sampling, measurement, survey research, experimental and quasi-experimental design, secondary data analysis, qualitative and mixed-methods approaches, and research ethics. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7738 - Public Policy Analysis in Criminal Justice


    Prerequisites: CJST 6613 CJST 6637  or the equivalent. An introduction to public policy and program analysis as applied within the criminal justice field. Topics include the impact of basic research on policy formulation and implementation. Special attention will be given to issues of decision-making and its tools. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7752 - Sexual Offenders and Predators


    An in-depth study of behavioral patterns and dynamics associated with persons who commit sexually motivated crimes and of the processes of victim selection and the identification of sexual offenders. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 7770 - ST: Selected Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    CJST 8801 - Criminal Justice Dissertation


    Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student’s progress in the preparation of the doctoral dissertation. This course may be taken more than once; each registration is for variable credit, from 1-9 hours. Each doctoral student will be required to complete a minimum of 18 trimester credit hours of dissertation credit prior to earning the PhD degree. 1-9 credits.

Chemical Engineering

  
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    CHME 6621 - Air Pollution Fundamentals


    Prerequisite: CHEM 6601  or consent of the instructor. An introduction to the sources of air pollution, transport of gaseous and particulate pollutants in the atmosphere on local and global scales, transformations of pollutants by atmospheric processes, impact of airborne pollutants on the environment, control of sources of air pollution, and legislative mandates. Introduction to meteorological concepts and computer transport models. Current issues such as ozone depletion and global warming will also be discussed. Cross-listed with CIVL 6661 . 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6622 - Air Pollution Control


    Prerequisite: CHME 6621 . Covers conventional and emerging air pollution control technologies. Conventional technologies include cyclone separators, baghouse filters, wet scrubbers, electrostatic precipitators, thermal and catalytic incineration, absorbers, and absorption systems. Emerging technologies will vary with new developments. Legislative mandates related to control technologies and emission limits will be discussed. 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6624 - Chemical Process Safety


    Prerequisite: undergraduate degree in engineering, chemistry, or physics or consent of the instructor. Methods of analysis and design for the control of hazards as applied to a chemical process environment. Emphasis on applications and current industrial practices. Topics include characterization of chemical hazards, toxic release modeling, fire and explosion prevention, pressure relief equipment design, hazard identification/risk, assessment techniques, and accident investigation. 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6670 - Selected Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and the instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6690 - Project


    Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or consent of the department chair and the program coordinator. Independent work under the guidance of an advisor in an area of mutual intererst, each study terminating in a technical report of academic merit. May involve research or design activity to solve a significant technical problem which utilizes chemical engineering concepts. 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6695 - Independent Study I


    A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6696 - Independent Study II


    A continuation of Independent Study I. 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6698 - Thesis I


    Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Periodic meetings and discussion of the individual student’s progress in the preparation of a thesis. 3 credits.
  
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    CHME 6699 - Thesis II


    A continuation of Thesis I. 3 credits.

Communication

  
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    COMM 6620 - Applied Communication in Organizations


    This course is a survey of communication theory as applied to the organizational environment. Special attention will be directed toward management communication styles, conflict, disagreement, changes in organizations, formal v. informal power and communication, people in organizations, structure of organizations, motivations, barriers to effective communication, and competencies involved in effectively communicating to the organization’s internal and external publics. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6621 - Managerial Communication


    Prerequisite: MGMT 6637  or HCAD 6601  or PSYC 6619  or PADM 6601 . Major emphasis on the role of communication in a democracry and the effects of communication content. Brief treatment of content analysis techniques, person-to-person communication, and barriers to the flow of communication. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6623 - Communication in Healthcare


    Examination of the diversity of communication encounters and contexts in which allied health professionals may be involved; emphasis on development of competencies and skills necessary to communicate effectively with staff, patients, and the community. Influence of interpersonal communication and mass media in staff development, patient care, and the marketing of healthcare. Students will develop a communication campaign aimed at internal and external audiences. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6631 - Public Information Dynamics


    How the executive can best present the organization in an accurate and favorable light to the news media. Training techniques for the public relations person who will work with executives giving corporate messages internally and press statements externally. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6632 - Contemporary Public Relation Issues


    Using the case-study approach, the course concentrates on the problems facing management and public relations executives in businesses and other institutions. The problems change from year to year, in tune with developments in society. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6640 - Communication Technologies


    An in-depth examination for non-technical students of technologies used with visual, voice data, and character information for communicating at a distance, for storing and subsequently retrieving information, and for processing information to improve communication efficiency. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6641 - Competition and Regulation in Telecommunication


    A study of proceedings before state public utility commissions and the Federal Communications Commission delineating the boundaries between those activities in the telecommunication field subject to regulation, those open to competition with restrictions, and those cleared to be fully competitive. The course will include discussion and analysis of contemporary legal proceedings affecting this topic. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6642 - Managment of Telecommunication Organizations


    A study and comparison of managerial systems and practices in users, manufacturers, distributors, and common carriers of telecommunication facilities. Identification of criteria necessary for developing and maintaining effective telecommunication organizations. Case problems will relate largely to specific instances from this field. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6643 - Telecommunication Policy and Strategy


    Examination of management policies and strategies for the complex telecommunication organization operating in a dynamic environment, from the viewpoint of the top-level executives of the organization. Development of analytic frameworks for the management of numerous elements involved in assuring the fulfillment of the goals of the total organization. Integration of the student’s general business knowledge with the content of the course. Emphasis is placed on the examination and discussion of cases drawn largely from the telecommunication industry. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6670 - Selected Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6693 - Internship


    A program of field experience, approved by the program advisor, under the tutelage of a professional in the field of communication. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6695 - Independent Study I


    A planned program of individual study or research in communication under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6696 - Independent Study II


    A continuation of Independent Study I. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6698 - Thesis I


    Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Periodic meetings with the advisor for discussion of the individual student’s progress in the preparation of a thesis. 3 credits.
  
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    COMM 6699 - Thesis II


    A continuation of Thesis I. 3 credits.

Computer Science

  
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    CSCI 6604 - Introduction to Programming/C


    Prerequisite: college algebra. A first course in computer programming using the C language, for those with little or no experience in programming. Problem solving methods, program planning, development, and testing. Sound programming practices and good style. Simple preprocessor usage, objects, expressions, functions, libraries, basic types, arrays, and pointers. Extensive programming will be required. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6610 - Intermediate Programming: C/C++


    Prerequisites: college algebra, CSCI 6604  or consent of the instructor. An intermediate-level programming course covering aspects of the C and C++ languages, including the preprocessor, syntax and semantics, algorithms, dynamic memory management, and elements of data structures.  Emphasis is on construction of portable, modular programs using object-oriented design techniques. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6617 - Java Programming


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6610 . Object-oriented programming, graphic interfaces, and event handling in Java, using Swing and the Abstract Windows Toolkit. Also covers files, exceptions, concurrency, and synchronization with threads. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6620 - Data Structures


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6610 .  The nature and application of the fundamental data structures and algorithms for arrays, growing arrays, lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, trees, and graphs. Algorithms include precedence parsing, heap-based priority queues, quicksort, radixsort, and hashing. Estimation of the time-efficiency of algorithms. Evaluation of the performance of different data structures for typical applications. Students will write and debug several projects in C++.  3 credit hours. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6622 - Database Systems


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6604  or knowledge of programming language. A survey of database systems, their purposes, structures, functions and uses. Topics include an overview of DB systems, major DB models, design and implementation, introduction to typical DB systems, and internal operation of DB systems. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6623 - Rapid Software Development/VB.Net


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6620 CSCI 6622 . A course for experienced programming students in rapid software development within the environment of “dot Net framework”.  Topics include the VB.Net IDE (Integrated Development Environment), human-computer interaction, GUI interface development, legacy remote-database connectivity using ODBC, as well as ADO.Net (ActiveX Data Object) method. Students will conceive, design, code, implement, document, and present a substantial programming project as the final product of this course. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6624 - Advanced Database Systems


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6622 . A second course in database systems covering advanced topics and new developments in the database field. Topics include database design methodologies and evaluation, embedded SQL, concurrency control, recovery schemes, security, query processing and optimization, and an introduction to object-oriented databases. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6625 - Software Project Management


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6620 . Project management, roles, and planning, including software and estimation, software quality, industry standards, technical staff evaluation, team management, project recovery, and risk management. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6626 - Object-Oriented Principles and Practice/C++


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6620 .  An advanced programming course taught in the C++ language. Objects, methods, abstract data types, data hiding, templates, inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling. Students will design and code several modular projects using C++. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6627 - Distributed Database Systems


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6622 CSCI 6643 . A course on the concepts, analysis and design of distributed database systems. Topics include distributed database architectures, distributed datebase design, semantic data control, distributed query processing, optimization of distributed queries, query decomposition, localization of distributed data, transcation management, concurrency control, distributed object management, distributed database reliability, paralled database systems. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6628 - Object-Oriented Analysis and Design


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6617  or CSCI 6623  or CSCI 6626  or consent of the instructor. An object-oriented design methodology course. Topics include system analysis, design, and implementation. Primary emphasis on the Unified Modeling Language (UML) methodology and its importance in developing a software project. Students will design a major group project and implement portions using C++ or Java or C#. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6629 - Software Quality Assurance


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6620  and at least one course in object-oriented programming. This course identifies activities that support delivery of consistent, well-performing results from the software engineering and development process. SQA encompasses activities from project initiation to product delivery, including requirements definition, software design and engineering, coding, source code control, code reviews, change and configuration management, testing, release management, and product integration. SQA provides the overarching control of all of these processes and methods. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6632 - Algorithm Design and Analysis


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6620 .  Study of the time and space complexity of algorithms and of efficient algorithm design. Topics include amortized analysis, advanced data structures, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, randomized algorithms, NP-Completeness. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6634 - Cryptography and Data Security


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6610 .  A survey of cryptographic concepts and algorithms and their application to data security. Techniques studied include private key cryptosystems, public key cryptosystems, and hash functions. Commonly used algorithms will also be studied, including DES, 3DES, IDEA, RSA, Diffie-Hellman, MD5, SHA, and DSS. Other algroithms examined will be those used to provide confidentiality, message authentication, key exchange, and digital signatures in applications such as client-server authentication, email security, and web security. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6636 - Structure of Programming Languages


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6620 . The structure, syntax, and semantic aspects of computer languages will be studied. Programs will be written in the FORTH language. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6637 - Introduction to Cyber Forensic Science


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6643 .  This course provides students with the basic theoretical and practical foundations necessary for the investigation of computer related or computer-assisted crimes.  The discipline of cyber forensic science will be discussed and outlined with emphasis on the sub-discipline of computer forensics.  Students will learn the basics of acquiring digital evidence from storage media, authenticating the digital evidence, and analyzing it.  Topics include: deleted file recovery, anti-forensics, rules of evidence, law as it relates to computer crime, computer crime scene search and seizure, memory forensics, introduction to file systems, e-mail forensics, and network forensics. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6638 - Small-Scale Digital Forensic Science


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6637 .  The theoretical and practical foundations necessary for the investigation of small scale digital devices (SSDDs).  SSDDs include mobile phones, smartphones, tablets and BlackBerry, and any device that could potentially fit in your pocket, and their respective operating systems such as Android and iOS.  Topics include: bagging and tagging SSDDs, logical and physical acquisition of SSDDs, analysis of SSDDs, authentication of SSDD evidence, evidence reconstruction, the various operating systems on SSDDs, SSDD ontology, and application artifacts found on SSDDs. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6639 - Enterprise Network Administration/Windows


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6642 .  Fundamentals of administration of a machine running versions of Microsoft Windows and its integration in a heterogeneous network.  Topics include file system layouts and backups, user and group management using Active Directory, network services such as DNS, DHCP, file sharing, printing, email including Exchange server, ftp and web services using IIS, databases, and general security issues including protection through security suites and intrusion detection systems.  Integration with Unix systems using Samba, Services For Unix and virtual machines.  Students will set up a network of machines using these principles. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6640 - Computer Organization


    The structure and the function of computers. The nature and the characteristics of modern computer systems and the operation of individual components: CPU, control unit, memory units, and I/O devices. Topics include addressing methods, machine-program sequencing, microprogramming, complex I/O organization, interrupt systems, multiple-module memory systems and caches, peripheral devices, microprocessors, pipeline organization, and memory interleaving. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6642 - Computer Networks and Data Communication


    Co-requisite: CSCI 6604 . The ISO 7-level model, network topology, communications theory, protocols, virtual circuits and packet switching, local networks (CSMA/CD, token ring), error detection and correction. Additional topics may include security (Data Encryption Standard, public-key cryptosystems), TCP/IP, sockets. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6643 - Operating Systems


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6604  or CSCI 6642 . Study of the function, structure, and design of multi-programming operating systems. Topics include basic computer organization, interrupts, process and thread management, scheduling, synchronization of concurrent processes, deadlock conditions.  Memory organization and management, virtual memory, memory protection, paging hardware.  Peripheral devices, file systems, file and free space management, file protection.  Virtual operating systems. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6645 - Unix Network Administration


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6642  or ELEC 6610 . Fundamentals of administration of a computer network composed of machines running versions of Unix. Topics include basic duties of a system administrator, overview of TCP/IP networking, file system layouts and backups, user and group management, network services such as DNS, NIS, DHCP, LDAP, file sharing, printing, mail, ftp, web, databases, and general security issues including protection through firewalls, secure shells, and intrusion detection systems. Students will set up a network of Unix machines using these principles. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6646 - Introduction to Computer Security


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6604 . Knowledge of networks is desireable. A survey of computer and network security issues including types of network attacks, viruses, intrusion detection and tracking, firewalls, trust relationships and authentication, secure connections, cryptography, and recent security policy and legislation. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6647 - Systems Programming


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6620 . Techniques for systems programming using the C language and libraries. Topics include data structures for system implementation, string processing, macro preprocessors, conditional compilation, UNIX system calls including file and directory operations and process control, inter-process communication, client-server routines. Programming projects required. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6648 - Cyber Security and Forensics Research Topics


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6637  or CSCI 6646 . An in-depth look at state-of-the-art issues related to computer security and digital forensic science. Students will be required to read and discuss state-of-the-art cyber and security and cyber forensics research articles. Debates on certain topics will be held in-class as well. Students, in a group, will conduct research and present the findings in class. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6649 - Enterprise Network Design


    Prerequisite: ELEC 6610  or CSCI 6642 . Building on foundation knowledge of local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and the OSI model, both large and small network designs are explored through lectures, labs, and an individual and a major group project. Topics and labs include Windows server administration, UNIX connectivity, Ethernet and Token Ring networks, implementing WANs using a simulated T1 environment, wireless LAN environments, configuring DSL routers, multi-vendor routers, managed switches, and network packet examination. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6650 - Computer Graphics


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6620 , MATH 6610  or equivalent. The mathematical foundations for computer graphics and introduction to the current state of the art graphics programming. Includes 2-D and 3-D viewing, geometric tranformations, clipping, segmentation, user interaction, curves, surfaces, color, modeling, and object hierarchy. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6651 - Introduction to Script Programming/Python


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6610 .  Techniques and tools for developing simple scripts in Python.  It introduces Python by a comparative approach and explores the Python libraries and their applications to varied tasks.  Individual scripting projects will be assigned.  Knowledge of C and/or Java is required. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6652 - Script Programming for Network Administration


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6604 .  Concepts and details of writing small programs in Python for the Unix and Window-Server operating systems. Security issues in shell scripts, batch file programming, Python scripts, and C programming. Students will write scripts to control network system resources. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6655 - Web-Database Application Development


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6622  and one of CSCI 6617  or CSCI 6623  or consent of the instructor. Fundamental principles and techniques for creating network applications. Topics include establishing network connections, database connectivity, Java Server Pages (JSP) or Active Server Pages (ASP), HTML forms, client-side scripting, SML, and network security issues. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6656 - iOS Development


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6617  or CSCI 6626  or consent of the academic advisor. An introduction to the iOS operating system, developing for mobile devices, and programming in Objective C. Each student will complete the design, implementation, and presentation of an iOS app. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6657 - Human Computer Interaction/Visual Programming


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6610  or consent of the instructor. The study of psychological and physiological factors on the design of the Human-Computer Interface (HCI). The influence of the various input and output devices on the efficacy of the interaction. Evaluation of the interaction as a function of the interface design. Evaluation issues including qualities such as learnability, usability, human efficiency, and accuracy. Students will design, implement, analyze and evaluate Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6660 - Artificial Intelligence


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6610 .  An introduction to the fundamental methods of artificial intelligence (AI) used in problem solving . Techniques include heuristic search, optimization, genetic algorithms, game playing, expert systems, probabilistic reasoning, learning strategies, neural networks, natural language understanding, image understanding. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6663 - Mobile Robotics


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6610 CSCI 6643 . Principles of mobile robots. Topics include locomotion mechanisms, sensor types and usage, reactive behavior, obstacle avoidance, path planning, and communication schemes. Students will work individually and in groups to program both Lego Mindstorms robots (NXC) and the Nao humanoid robot (Python). 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6665 - Digital Image Processing


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6610 , MATH 6610  or equivalent. Theoretical and mathematical bases of techniques of digital imaging processing and programming methodologies necessary to implement such techniques. Introduction to current capabilities of digital image acquisition hardware. Implementation of standard procedures for image enhancement, morphology, compression, and storage. Image transforms and information extraction techniques in both the spatial and Fourier frequency domains. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6667 - Video Game Design


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6617  or CSCI 6623 . This course is intended as an introduction to the world of video game design, focusing on developing 2-D video games. Topics will cover all parts of the design process, from initial concept generation to working product. Students will design and implement their own games using a tool such as Gamemaker. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6670 - Selected Topics


    Prerequisite: The nature of any prerequisites will depend on the topic. An examination of new developments or current practices in computer science. Topics will vary from trimester to trimester. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6682 - Wireless Networks


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6642 . The fundamentals of wireless network technologies will be studied, including various wireless spectra, wireless communication, signal propagation, antenna technologies, and physical and MAC layer protocols. Commonly-used Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN) technologies such as Bluetooth and ZigBee, and Wireless Local Area Netowrk (WLAN) technologies such as WiFi and HIPERLAN will also be examined. The last part of the course will focus on wireless security.
      3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6683 - Long Range Wireless Network Technologies


    Prerequisite: CSCI 6682 . A continuation of CSCI 6682 , students will work on software and hardware used in industry, and the course prepares graduate students for careers working with different vendors, enterprises, and service providers that work on wireless technologies. It provides in-depth knowledge of cellular and mobile wireless systems. Labs will provide hands-on experience on advanced technologies in communication systems, and will bridge theory with applications and help students receive training required to meet the desired needs of industry. Topics include cellular systems starting from the first generation (1G) to the fourth generation (4G), including GSM and LTE, WiMAX (the IEEE 802.16 standard), and wireless ad-hoc networks including wireless sensor networks. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6690 - Master’s Project


    Prerequisites: 15 credit hours, a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.3, and completion of all core courses. Petition to register must be approved by a supervising faculty member, the program coordinator, and the department chair. Completion of a significant project in the student’s concentration area under the guidance on an advisor, such study terminating in a technical report of academic merit. For example, the project may be a survey of a technical area in computer science or may involve the solution of an actual or hypothetical technical problem. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6692 - Internship I


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6620 ,18 graduate credit hours, cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, and consent of the graduate coordinator and advisor. An on-the-job learning experience with a selected organization, taken for academic credit under the supervision of a faculty internship advisor. 1 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6693 - Internship II


    A continuation of Internship I. 1 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6694 - Internship III


    A continuation of Internship II. 1 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6695 - Independent Study I


    Prerequisite: petition to register must be approved by a supervising faculty member, the program coordinator, and the department chair. Independent study under the guidance of an advisor in an area disignated by the program coordinator in consultation with the student. 3 credits.
  
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    CSCI 6696 - Independent Study II


    A continuation of Independent study I. 3 credits.
 

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