2018-2019 Graduate Catalog 
    
    Jul 02, 2022  
2018-2019 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are arranged alphabetically by the course prefix code letters, as listed here. For the purpose of brevity, course descriptions may consist of sentence fragments. Unless otherwise specified, graduate courses carry three credits. 

 

Forensic Science

  
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    FORS 6626 - Crime Scene Reconstruction


    Prerequisite: FORS 6616 .  Theoretical and practical aspects of crime scene reconstruction will be addressed in this course. A basic understanding of crime scene analysis, and related functions: evidence recognition, collection and preservation, documentation, effective search methods, and subsequent laboratory-based analysis of the evidence is required. Common types of crime scene reconstruction will be explored: blood stain analysis, shooting incident, and accident reconstruction. A major focus of this course is to learn how to design and conduct relevant testing, consistent with the scientific method. The course will conclude with the preparation of a reconstruction report and oral presentation of that work in a legal setting. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6634 - Bloodstain Pattern Analysis


    Prerequisite: FORS 6626 . This course is intended to develop a fundamental knowledge of the discipline of bloodstain pattern analysis.  The course is intended to illustrate to students the basic principles of bloodstain pattern analysis and the practical application of the discipline to actual casework.  A significant portion of the course will be conducted in a laboratory format and will involve interpreting real bloodstain patterns.  Laboratory fee. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6640 - Advanced Criminalistics II


    Introduction of advanced microscopic, chemical, and instrumental methods with extensive hands-on experience provided by a laboratory section. Principles and methods of analysis of microscopic and macroscopic evidence such as glass, soil, papers, inks, dyes, paints, varnishes, explosives, fibers, drugs, and other potential physical traces will be discussed. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6641 - Advanced Criminalistics Laboratory II


    Prerequisite: FORS 6614 . Laboratory course to develop skills needed for the non-biological forensic science laboratory work.  Instrumental, wet chemical and physical methods typically used in forensic science laboratories presented in a problem based learning environment.  Laboratory fee required. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6642 - Wildlife Forensics


    Co-requisite: FORS 6612  or FORS 6614 . Wildlife forensic science is a relatively new and diverse discipline in the forensic sciences. Practitioners of wildlife forensics include experts in biology to pathology to digital evidence. The crimes that could be investigated include poaching, smuggling, and illegal pet trade, to name just a few. This course will examine the different specialties that might be required in a wildlife forensic case and how the case will be approached.  Laboratory fee. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6645 - Drug Chemistry and Identification


    Introduction to licit and illicit drugs as evidence, followed by an overview of chemical, microscopical, and instrumental techniques used for their identification; discussion of sampling, separation, and quantitation of evidence specimens; presentation of drug chemistry expert testimony in courts of law. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6651 - Forensic Archaeology


    Co-requisite: FORS 6612  or FORS 6614 . Forensic archaeology is a relatively new field in the forensic sciences. Traditionally, exhumations were conducted by forensic anthropologists; however, there is a growing trend of having individuals trained specifically in archaeology conduct these digs.  A forensic archaeologist is trained in the classical methods of excavation; however, they also have a detailed knowledge of evidence and its collection.  Furthermore, the archaeologist must have a working knowledge of human skeletal anatomy so that they can identify any human remains.  This class will instruct students in the multiple ways of conducting an excavation with the component of a body exhumation included.  The exhumation will include evidence of both a biologic and non-biologic nature.  Laboratory fee. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6652 - Forensic Anthropology


    Co-requisite: FORS 6612  or FORS 6614 .  Forensic anthropology is one of the largest disciplines within the forensic sciences. A classical forensic anthropologist is called when bones or highly decomposed remains are discovered. The role of the anthropologist is to determine if the remains are, first and foremost, human and of legal importance. If the remains are of legal significance, they are then examined to determine several key points which can be used by law enforcement for identification. This course will take the student through the process of decomposition from fresh to skeletonized remains and the process of individualization of those remains. At the end of the course, the student will also have an in-depth knowledge of skeletal anatomy. Laboratory fee. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6653 - Physical Analysis in Forensic Science


    Prerequisite: FORS 6612  or FORS 6614 . This course examines the physical analysis of numerous types of forensic evidence to include imprints and impressions, biometric applications, questioned documents, firearm examination, and shooting incident reconstruction. This course will also discuss databasing and ethical considerations for a variety of forensic evidence types. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6654 - Physical Analysis in Forensic Science Laboratory


    Laboratory fee required. 1 credits.
  
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    FORS 6655 - Firearm Evidence Analysis


    Prerequisite or co-requisite: FORS 6612  or FORS 6614 . This course will examine firearms function, ammunition function, and the relationship between firearms and ammunition. The causation and effects of firearms and ammunition for the forensic person, i.e. identification of bullets and ammunition casings, will also be examined.  Laboratory fee. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6660 - Forensic Microscopy


    The theory and techniques of optical microscopy required to use the micoscope for evidence detection, analysis, and evaluation. Microscopical methods of analysis and polarized light microscopy will be covered in lecture and laboratory. Laboratory fee required. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6661 - Medicolegal Investigation and Identification


    Prerequisite: FORS 6612 . An introduction to procedures and techniques for medicolegal investigation of questioned death and identification of deceased persons, including autopsy techniques, odontological procedures, and anthropological approaches. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6662 - Forensic Toxicology


    Forensic Toxicology is presented as a mechanistic/biochemical exploration of the issues and drugs and questions routinely confronting the practicing forensic toxicologist. Following an initial exploration of the historical roots of the discipline, the course moves through an organ-system review of physiologic function, and the mechanisms by which specific and typical toxic classes and species interfere with those functions. Neurologic functions and toxicity are a special interest and focus of this section. The final sections of the course deal with some of the major drug classes, including opiates, other drugs of abuse, natural and herbal drugs, and plants and animal poison, toxins and venoms. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6663 - Forensic Field Technology


    Prerequisites: FORS 6612 , FORS 6653 . Co-requisite: FORS 6664 . This lecture based course will introduce students to technologies that are used in the field as well as how the data collected in the field can be entered and processed by the relevant databases. The technologies can include instruments of discovery such as ground-penetrating radar and in-field analysis using portable Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, as well as other contemporary technologies and developments. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6664 - Forensic Field Technology Laboratory


    Prerequisites: FORS 6612 , FORS 6653 .  Co-requisite: FORS 6663 . This laboratory based course will introduce students to technologies that are used in the field as well as how the data collected in the field can be entered and processed by the relevant databases. The technologies can include instruments of discovery such as ground-penetrating radar and in-field analysis using portable Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, as well as other contemporary technologies and developments. Laboratory fee. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6670 - Selected Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6673 - Forensic DNA Analysis


    Prerequisites: FORS 6614 FORS 6620 , FORS 6621 . Methods of modern biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology as applied to the examination and individualization of biological evidence in forensic science. Includes discussion of prior methods up to the most current used today in forensic biology. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6674 - Forensic DNA Analysis Laboratory


    Co-requisite: FORS 6673 . This course is intended to provide an advanced, comprehensive, “hands on” experience of what it is to be a forensic DNA analyst.  Students will complete the processing and analysis of a piece of evidence with multiple samples on it from documentation to statistical analysis of DNA profiles.  DNA extraction, quantitation PCR amplification, allele detection, PCR artifact identification, and DNA profile Interpretation of complex mixtures will be performed by each student.  The areas of laboratory Quality Assurance/Quality Control will also be covered within the context of the Quality Assurance Standards for Forensic DNA Testing Laboratories.  Laboratory fee required. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6686 - Forensic Science Research Project I


    Individual guidance on a research endeavor. 1-3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6687 - Forensic Science Research Project II


    Prerequisite: FORS 6686 .  A continuation of Research Project I. 1-3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6688 - Forensic Science Internship I


    Formal educational development is complemented by field placement experience in a forensic science laboratory or identification unit. Field experience is supervised by designated agency and department personnel. Students must complete a project in connection with the internship placement and experience; an appropriate work product must be provided to the instructor. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6689 - Forensic Science Internship II


    Prerequisite: FORS 6688 . Formal educational development is complemented by field placement experience in a forensic science laboratory or identification unit. Field experience is supervised by designated agency and department personnel. Students must complete a project in connection with the internship placement and experience; an appropriate work product must be provided to the instructor. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6695 - Independent Study


    A directed independent learning experience, the topic and format to be agreed upon by the student and supervising faculty. 1-3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6697 - Thesis I with Seminar


    This course will introduce students to the thesis requirement of the forensic science program.  The student will have periodic meetings and discussions regarding the progress towards completion of the thesis.  Students will participate in weekly seminars related to the review, discussion and presentation of scientific literature to provide students with exposure to a wide variety of topics in forensic science. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6698 - Thesis II


    A continuation of Thesis I. 3 credits.
  
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    FORS 6699 - Thesis III


    A continuation of Thesis II. 3 credits.

Fire Science

  
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    FIRE 6625 - Chemistry of Fires and Explosions


    An examination of the basic organic chemistry and combustion and explosive properties of flammable materials. The chemical principles underlying fires and explosions. Chemical properties of various synthetic materials and the products of their combustion. Fire retardant materials and chemicals used in fire extinguishment. Cross-listed with CHEM 6625 FORS 6625 .  3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6631 - Organization and Management of Fire and Emergency Medical Services


    This course will provide the student with a presentation of modern management principles and techniques to the organization and delivery of the array of services that communities have come to expect from a fire service. The traditional and evolving roles of the fire service to protection, prevention, risk analysis, emergency medical services, and community service are also considered. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6632 - Strategic Planning for Public Safety Leaders


    This course will examine the application of systematic long range or “master” planning in determining the types and levels of community fire and emergency medical services. As part of this course each student will develop a strategic plan for a public safety organization using one of the commonly accepted approaches to strategic planning in the public domain.  3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6633 - Issues in Public Safety Professional Responsibility


    This course addresses the unique ethical problems and environments in which public safety services are delivered. Specific issues covered include public safety discretion, codes of conduct and discipline, and the ethical exercise of the “public trust.” Investigation of the ways in which organizations can anticipate and plan for ethical problems. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6634 - Issues in Public Safety Management


    Provides public safety professionals with a broad view of current topics in the field. Utilizing lectures, discussions, and case studies, the course will consider the results of applying modern public management practices and principles in a public safety context. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6649 - Fire Scene Investigation and Arson Analysis


    The techniques of crime scene documentation and investigation as they relate to fire and explosion scenes. Evidence recognition and collection. Laboratory analysis of fire scene, arson accelerant, and explosion scene residues. Scientific proof of arson. Laboratory fee required.  Cross-listed with CJST 6649 . 4 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6650 - Arson for Profit


    This course provides an overview of the financial techniques needed to investigate arson-for-profit fires, with an emphasis on sources of information, identification, and analysis of financial documents. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6661 - Systems Approach to Fire Safety


    The systems approach to fire safety as used by fire protection engineers, fire science technicians, and fire administrators in analyzing and designing fire safety in buildings. Considers the various routes that can be followed to achieve low budget, logical, cost-effective ways of accomplishing predetermined fire safety goals. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6663 - Fire Protection Systems Application


    A study of the application of various fire protection systems and programs to fire/life safety problems. An in-depth review of certian fire protection codes and standards and the proper interpretation of each will be included. Use of codes and standards to determine specific protection requirements will be emphasized. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6664 - Terrorism


    A detailed discussion and review of the consequences of terrorism and the offensive measures taken by emergency response organizations to prevent, deter, and respond to terrorism incidents. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6665 - Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson Investigation


    The legal principles underlying and governing the conduct of criminal investigations, with particular emphasis on arson. The criminal law relating to arson, establishment of the crime, investigation, and prosecution procedures in arson cases. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6666 - Industrial Fire Protection


    Prepares fire professionals to make decisions on various fire protection schemes in industry and other commercial property situations. Since fire protection responsibilities are often delegated to the occupational safety or security manager, the course provides background in fire protection for these individuals. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6667 - Fire and Building Codes, Standards, and Practices


    The study of building and fire codes and regulations as they relate to prevention and incidence of structural fires. Contemporary building and fire codes and practices and their enforcement. Model building codes. Fire prevention and control through building design.  Cross-listed with CJST 6667 . 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6668 - Fire Casualty Insurance Practices


    A study of financial risk and decision making. Insurance rate making and relation to risk and other factors. Insurence adjustment and economic factors that must be considered in fire and accident investigations.  Cross-listed with CJST 6668 . 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6669 - Dynamics, Evaluation, and Prevention of Structural Fires


    A detailed analysis of the factors and physical processes that govern the growth and spread of fire and its products within a structure. Includes a review and an evaluation of national, state, and local fire loss data leading to the development of fire prevention strategies.  Cross-listed with CJST 6669 . 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6670 - Selected Topics


    An examination and evaluation of the current and future problems faced by today’s fire, public safety, and insurance and security professionals. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6681 - Seminar/Research Project in Public Safety Management I


    Prerequisite: 18 undergraduate/graduate hours in a public safety discipline or consent of the program coordinator. Problems in public safety management and current techniques being used to deal with them. Requires a supervised research project directly related to the topic and weekly meetings with faculty throughout the term. Format of course may vary; a three-day specially scheduled seminar may be included. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6684 - Fire Scene Reconstruction


    Application of the principles of reconstruction of the scene, including fire behavior, fire pattern analysis, ignition mechanisms, interpretation of human behavior, and fire scene analysis. Emphasis on scene documentation, origin and cause determination, preparation of reports, arson motives, rendering of advisory opinions to assist in the resolution of disputes affecting life and property.  Cross-listed with CJST 6684 . 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6690 - Research Project


    Prerequisite: completion of 30 credits of graduate work. A major research project under the supervision of the director of the fire science program. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6693 - Internship


    The student’s formal educational development is complemented by field experience in various fire science settings or agencies. Under faculty supervision, the student engages in field experience and produces a comprehensive project report analyzing the internship experience. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6695 - Independent Study


    A directed, independent learning experience with the topic and format to be agreed upon by the student and supervising faculty. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6698 - Thesis I


    Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Periodic meeting and discussions of the individual student’s progress in the preparation of a thesis. 3 credits.
  
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    FIRE 6699 - Thesis II


    A continuation of Thesis I. 3 credits.

Healthcare Administration

  
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    HCAD 6600 - Introduction to U.S. Healthcare System


    A comprehensive overview of the basic structures and operations of the U.S.healthcare system.  This course includes the historical origins and current social and political contexts in which health care is provided. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6601 - Management of Healthcare Organizations


    Identification of the characteristics of healthcare organizations and the dimensions of management in such organizations. Examination and application of the principles of management necessary for the successful operation of healthcare organizations. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6602 - Management Information Systems in Healthcare


    The use of computers in the healthcare field. Review of the history of information systems and their application in healthcare settings. Survey of problems and issues inherent to healthcare information management. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6603 - Financial Management of Healthcare Organizations


    Recommended prerequisite: HCAD 6601 . Theory and application of financial planning and management techniques in healthcare organizations. Emphasis on financial decision making and on preparation of short- and long-term cash, capital, revenue and expense budgets and financial plans to meet the requirements of HCFA and other third parties. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6604 - Law and Public Health


    This course examines the laws relating to the public health at the federal, state, and local level as well as the practical administration of those laws.  3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6605 - Healthcare Ethics


    Explores and defines a wide spectrum of critical ethical issues; factors that should be considered in resolving these issues; investigation of ways in which organizations can anticipate and plan for future ethical problems. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6606 - Statistics in Healthcare Administration


    Statistics in Healthcare Administration This course introduces research methods and the fundamental statistics needed to succeed in today’s healthcare organizations. The course follows a practical approach that allows the student to learn key statistical principles and learn ways to effectively convey data and results using Excel and other statistical software. This course covers both quantitative and qualitative research methods used in healthcare. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6607 - Communication in Healthcare


    Examination of the diversity of communication encounters and contexts in which allied health professionals may be involved; emphasis on development of competencies and skills necessary to communicate effectively with staff, patients, and the community.  Influence of interpersonal communication and mass media in staff development, patient care, and the marketing of healthcare.  Students will develop a communication campaign aimed at internal and external audiences.  3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6608 - Healthcare Administration Capstone


    Prerequisite: 15 credit hours or consent of the program director.  A faculty-mentored team project based on a real-world problem or project from a health care organization. Teams of students create deliverables for their organizational client. A final project report is written that describes the problem, outlines the scope of work, and presents recommendations and solutions in a professional manner. An oral presentation is made and presented by the team. This capstone experience concludes the program and will address all five domains of healthcare administration: communication and relationship management, professionalism, leadership, knowledge of healthcare environment, and business knowledge and skills.  3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6629 - Healthcare Reimbursements


    Ways reimbursements are regulated and collected; financial implications of third-party reimbursements for all types of healthcare providers. Focus on history as well as current and future programs related to the most complicated payment methods in any industry. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6631 - Strategic Management and Planning of Healthcare Organizations


    This course covers theories and strategies used in strategic management of healthcare organizations. Practical approaches to strategic planning, analysis of the healthcare environment, understanding organizational behavior and structure and implementation of strategic plans. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6633 - Project Management in Healthcare


    This course addresses the concepts and principles of project management and allows students to apply that knowledge to healthcare organizations. Students will learn how to create and design a project; plan, schedule and budget a project, and monitor and evaluate projects in a healthcare setting. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6635 - Health Information Analytics


    Prerequisites: HCAD 6605  or PADM 6611 , HCAD 6602 . This course will examine the roles and uses of health information technology in healthcare and the tools and techniques used to identify, analyze and communicate healthcare data. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6637 - Healthcare Data Mining


    Prerequisite: HCAD 6635 .  Students will learn the basics of quantitative data analysis methods and software used in healthcare analytics. Students will have hands-on experiences with real healthcare data sets and software. Students will apply this knowledge and skills to real world cases and learn how to communicate healthcare data and information effectively to multiple audiences.  3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6645 - Healthcare Economics and Finance


    Prerequisite: HCAD 6603 . Integration of accounting, economics, finance, budgeting, and health insurance principles, concepts, and analytic tools essential to the decision-making processes of healthcare organizations. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6647 - Alternative Healthcare Delivery Systems


    A survey of nontraditional approaches to healthcare. Includes cost shifting, cost sharing, the development of outpatient facilities, and the impact of cost containment regulation in a systems-oriented framework. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6649 - Health Policy and Politics


    Students will learn about how health policy is made at the local, state, and federal level and how politics influence health care policy, delivery, finance, and organization. Students will learn about current issues in health politics and policy including the Affordable Care Act. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6650 - Introduction to Public Health


    This course introduces the field of public health and its core domains to students interested in managing the health of populations, governmental health administration, and public policy. This course introduces and distinguishes public health thinking from traditional clinical approaches and explores biostatistics, epidemiology, social and behavioral health and health education, health services administration and management, and environmental health. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6651 - Public Health Ethics


    This course will explore ethical issues and concepts as they relate to public health practice, research, and policy. Current issues are discussed  including: the right to health and health care, vaccine ethics, bioterrorism, health inequalities, poverty, and power.  Student evaluation is based on class participation, a small group project, and a final paper based upon a case study addressing ethical issues. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6652 - Population Health Management


    Students in this course will explore the emerging field of population health management. Students will develop a working definition of population health management and distinguish PHM from existing disciplines such as chronic disease management and public health. Students will explore existing models for understanding population health including health behavior and social determinants models. Students will develop a population health management project that could be implemented at the health system, community, state, or regional level.

      3 credits.

  
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    HCAD 6653 - Human Resource Planning in Healthcare


    Exploration of principles and functions of human resource planning in a healthcare organization. Topics include legal and public policy parameters, demographics and the healthcare workforce, disparate employee groups and their special concerns, implementation and evaluation of human resource planning in healthcare settings. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6655 - Comparative Health Systems and Global Health


    This course will compare and contrast health care system organization, delivery, and financing across multiple developed and developing nations. Students will gain in-depth knowledge about health care from a global perspective including global disease burden, international health metrics and indicators, and the role of global health organizations like WHO, PAHO, OECD and others.  3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6670 - 6674 - Special Topics


    A study of relevant topics of particular interest to students and instructor.  Course may be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6675 - Healthcare Leadership


    This course will explore the current state of healthcare leadership, leadership models and approaches, and the values and decision-making processes of leaders in healthcare organizations. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6676 - Responsible Conduct of Research


    This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and act upon current and emerging ethical issues in the conduct of research.  Students will develop familiarity with existing research regulations and rules.  Cross-disciplinary topics such as mentorship, authorship, honesty, and responsibilities to research subjects, colleagues, institutions, and the broader public will be addressed.

      3 credits.

  
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    HCAD 6681 - Long-Term Healthcare Internship I


    Prerequisite: HCAD 6603 . First of two internships state-required for eligibility to take the State of Connecticut licensing examination in long-term care administration. Course is composed of a 450-hour nursing home internship. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6682 - Long-Term Healthcare Internship II


    Prerequisite: HCAD 6681 .  A continuation of Long-Term Healthcare Internship I. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6683 - Long-Term Health Care Internship


    Prerequisite or co-requisite: HCAD 6646 . Course is composed of 500 hours in a skilled nursing facility. This course is available only to students who will have completed at least 45 hours of an appropriate graduate program. Contact the Director, Healthcare Program, for further information. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6690 - Research Seminar in Healthcare Administration


    This course teaches students how to conduct a research project and to communicate the results of that research in manuscript suitable for publication in an academic or trade publication.  Students will identify a research topic, data sources (if needed), conduct research and analysis of that topic, and generate a final manuscript for review. Faculty will guide and mentor the research and writing process. Academic publication, peer-review, the editorial process, and cover letter writing will be discussed.

      3 credits.

  
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    HCAD 6691 - Contemporary Issues in Healthcare


    Gives healthcare professionals a broad view of current topics in their field. Students will view current videotapes, work on case studies, participate in class exercises, and present several reports. Current articles illustrate the issues under discussion. 3 credits.
  
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    HCAD 6693 - Healthcare Administration Internship


    A supervised work experience in a healthcare organization. Students must complete a minimum of 150 hours of internship and complete a paper about their internship experience.

      3 credits.

  
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    HCAD 6695 - Independent Study


    A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

      3 credits.


History

  
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    HIST 6607 - World History in the Twentieth Century


    A survey of major global events and trends since 1900. Advanced industrial societies emphasized, but coverage of major regions of the Third World also studied. Includes the World Wars, patterns of economic cooperation and competition, decolonization, and East-West conflicts. 3 credits.
  
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    HIST 6610 - Survey of United States History


    Broad-based review of American history from colonialism to the present. This course is designed specifically for preservice teachers to meet Connecticut state certification requirements. 3 credits.
  
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    HIST 6650 - Latin American History


    Analyzes the history of colonial Latin America from Ancient American and pre-contact fifteenth-century Europe through to the nineteenth century independence revolutions and the modern struggles with political instability and economic dependence. The focus is on how the admixture of European and New World inputs gave rise to unique Latin American cultures. 3 credits.
  
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    HIST 6670 - Selected Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HIST 6695 - Independent Study


    A planned program of individual study or research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 3 credits.

Humanities

  
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    HUMN 6651 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HUMN 6652 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HUMN 6653 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    HUMN 6654 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HUMN 6655 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HUMN 6656 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HUMN 6657 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    HUMN 6658 - Topics in Humanities


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
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    HUMN 6659 - Writing and Speaking for Professionals


    A practical, tool-oriented approach for professionals who need to perfect writing and speaking skills for career advancement or presentations in graduate courses. Students generate work-related writing/speaking assignments and negotiate learning contracts based on editing, writing, and speaking methods related to individual needs and objectives.  Cross-listed with ENGL 6659 . 3 credits.
  
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    HUMN 6695 - Independent Study


    A planned program of individual study or research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 3 credits.

Industrial Engineering

  
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    INDE 6601 - Introduction to Operations Research/Management Science


    Prerequisite: INDE 6607 . Introduction to the techniques and philosophies of management science and operations research. Includes linear programming, inventory analysis, queueing theory, dynamic programming, decision analysis, and other modeling techniques. 3 credits.
  
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    INDE 6604 - Management Systems


    Techniques of industrial and governmental systems management, including general systems and organizational theory. 3 credits.
  
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    INDE 6607 - Probability Theory


    Prerequisite: basic knowledge of differential calculus. Probability of events, definition of random variables, and introduction to basic probability distributions. Use of probability in stochastic processes pertaining to queues, forecasting, birth-death processes, and human behavior. 3 credits.
 

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