2018-2019 Graduate Catalog 
    
    Nov 29, 2022  
2018-2019 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions are arranged alphabetically by the course prefix code letters, as listed here. For the purpose of brevity, course descriptions may consist of sentence fragments. Unless otherwise specified, graduate courses carry three credits. 

 

Industrial Engineering

  
  •  

    INDE 6609 - Descriptive and Inferential Statistics


    Prerequisite: INDE 6607  or equivalent. Inferential statistical designs, including basic statistical tests and analysis of variance. Statistical theories and application of correlation analysis, multiple linear regression, nonlinear regression, and analysis of covariance. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6611 - Decisions in Operations Management


    Prerequisites: MGMT 6637 QANL 6604  or equivalent. Study of organizations as systems producing goods and services. Review of concepts, functions, and basic techniques as applied to operations management. Examination of new trends and developments such as just-in-time, synchronous manufacturing, quality management, cycle-time reduction, and concurrent engineering. Emphasis on interrelations of different operational decisions on the final product and competitive position of the organization. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6612 - Managerial Interactions I


    An interdisciplinary systems approach to human behavior in organizations with emphasis on the impact of industrial engineering methods on organizational performance. Deals with individual motivation and face-to-face interaction in managerial roles. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6613 - Managerial Interactions II


    Prerequisite: INDE 6612 . Continuation of INDE 6612 . Organizational development, job enrichment, and modern work attitudes. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6614 - Data Information Systems


    Prerequisites: any one of CSCI 6604  through CSCI 6610  or equivalent, INDE 6604 . Introduction to automated information systems planning and operations and their impact on management decision making, control functions, and communication capabilties. An overview of concepts and procedures with applications in urban environments, large organizations, and governmental agencies. Techniques presented include PERT/CPM, Gantt charting, cost-benefit analysis. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6615 - Transportation and Distribution


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601  or equivalent. Introduction to transportation science with emphasis on physical distribution problems. Survey of operations research models, and optimization strategies and their roles in transportation systems management. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6617 - Engineering Economic Analysis and Cost Estimating


    This course introduces engineering students to the fundamental concepts, methods, and tools of economic analysis and managerial decision-making from a cash flow perspective. Emphasis will be on the time value of money, present worth analysis, annual equivalent worth, rate of return, depreciation, and inflation analyses; evaluation of projects, and comparison and selection among alternatives will also be covered. General accounting principles and basic financial analysis will also be introduced.

      3 credits.

  
  •  

    INDE 6621 - Linear Programming


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601  or equivalent. Thorough coverage of the techniques and applications of linear programming. Special simplex forms and optimality conditions, duality, and sensitivity are covered. Applications to network flow problems. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6622 - Queueing Theory


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601  or equivalent. Elements of queueing theory including finite and infinite cases. Single server and multiple server parallel channels/series queues and special cases are analyzed. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6623 - Decision Analysis


    Prerequisite: INDE 6609  or equivalent. Decision theory, game theory, benefit-cost analyses under uncertainty; advanced engineering economic analysis. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6624 - Quality Analysis


    Prerequisite: INDE 6609  or equivalent. Concepts of quality and statistical quality analysis. Sampling techniques and decision processes. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6625 - Advanced Mathematical Programming


    Prerequisites: CSCI 6606 or equivalent, INDE 6621 . Advanced mathematical programming techniques. Integer programming, goal programming, and multiple objective linear programming techniques will be covered. Computer applications will be demonstrated. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6627 - Value Engineering and Design


    Concurrent requisite: INDE 6609  or EGRM 6609 . A framework for optimal design based on internal and external issues related to value-added criteria is provided. Topics to be covered include: function analysis and costing, the technology roadmap, and techniques involving customer-oriented product concepts in the areas of performance, maintenance/service, user friendliness, and quality. Case studies and real-world situations are presented. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6628 - Sigma Six Quality Planning


    Prerequisite: INDE 6609  or EGRM 6609 . Review of Six Sigma and its role in managing quality at all levels of an organization, including its relationship to Lean initiatives. Presentation of Six Sigma history, philosophy, tools, processes, and significant case studies. Projects utilize the techniques to generate “hands-on” experience. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6639 - Achieving Optimal Operations


    Prerequisite: INDE 6609  or EGRM 6609 . Concepts of lean production, Japanese production systems, push vs. pull production systems, benchmarking and evaluation schemes, schedule management, overcoming bottlenecks, and performance and productivity improvement techniques applicable to service and manufacturing systems. Workforce issues (affairs) including union acceptance, productivity, and workforce education, training, and compensation. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6641 - Supply Chain Management


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601 . Introduction to global supply chain management in support of manufacturing and technical services, with emphasis on procurement, use of web-based information technology, logistics, and integration with JIT scheduling at the customer level.  3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6643 - Reliability and Maintainability


    Prerequisite: INDE 6609  or equivalent. The basic theory and methodology of reliabiliy and maintainability, including application of discrete and continuous distributions and statistical designs. Reliability, estimation, structure models, and growth models. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6651 - Human Engineering I


    An introduction to the design of machines, jobs, and environments with consideration of ergonomic principles. Coverage of behavioral, anatomical, physiological, and organizational factors affecting performance, comfort, and safety. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6652 - Human Engineering II


    Prerequisite: INDE 6651  or equivalent. Continuation of  INDE 6651 . In-depth analysis of selected topics in ergonomics, including work physiology, anthropometry, and signal detection theory. Laboratory experiments and reports included. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6655 - Manufacturing Analysis


    Prerequisites: undergraduate courses in manufacturing or manufacturing work experience and consent of the instructor. The principles of the theory of metal cutting and metal working for improving the manufacturing operations involving metal machining and metal working. An opportunity for students to thoroughly understand the experimental approaches used in manufacturing. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6661 - Facility Infrastructure


    An overview of facilities planning and design considerations, with an emphasis on service and non-manufacturing facilities. Coverage includes facilities planning approaches and procedures, ergonomic considerations, access and accomodation issues, flow of people and materials, facility services, and facility flexibility and adaptability. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6671 - Current Topics in Operations Research


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601  or equivalent or consent of the instructor. An examination of new developments or current practices in operations research. A topic will be selected for thorough study. Possible subject areas include nonlinear programming, network theory, scheduling techniques, specialized techniques, specialized applications. Content may vary from trimester to trimester. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6672 - Current Topics in Industrial Engineering


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601  or consent of the instructor. An examination of new developments or current practices in industrial engineering. A topic will be selected for thorough study. Possible subject areas include reliability, production engineering, human factors, specialized applications. Content may vary from term to term. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6681 - System Simulation


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601 . Modeling and analysis of systems using discrete event simulation technique with particular emphasis on applications in production and operations management, manufacturing, and services. Lean implementation via simulation analysis. The role and significance of data, data collection, random number generators and uncertainty in input variables will be examined. Use of simulation software and several projects will be required. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6682 - Advanced System Simulation


    Prerequisite: INDE 6681  or equivalent. Emphasis will be on model building and on design and analysis of simulation experiments for service and manufacturing systems. Student projects in real environments are required. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6683 - Systems Analysis


    Prerequisites: INDE 6601 INDE 6609  or equivalent, INDE 6614 . Techniques and philosophies defining the concept of systems analysis presented in detail, illustrated with large-scale case studies. Diverse systems are analyzed covering the social, urban, industrial, and military spheres. Techniques include utility theory, decision analysis, and technological forecasting. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6685 - Theory of Optimization


    Prerequisites: INDE 6601 , CSCI 606 or equivalent. Methods of nonlinear optimization and programming. Search methods including golden section and dichotomous; constrained and unconstrained optimization including Rosenbrocks and Fletcher-Powell algorithms. Penalty and barrier function methods. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6686 - Production and Inventory Analysis


    Prerequisites: INDE 6601 INDE 6607  or equivalent. Inventory theory and models and their applications to production and operations. Methods of production including Kanban systems, JIT, MRP and their relations to fundamental inventory techniques with computer applications. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6687 - Stochastic Processes


    Prerequisite: INDE 6601  or equivalent. The theory and application of discrete and continuous-time stochastic processes. Areas of application include queueing, inventory, maintenance, and probabilistic dynamic programming models. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6688 - Design of Experiments


    Prerequisite: INDE 6609  or equivalent. Principles of modern statistical experimentation and practice in use of basic designs for scientific and industrial experiments; single factor experiments, randomized blocks, Latin squares; factorial and fractional factorial experiments, surface fitting designs. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6690 - Research Project


    Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours and consent of the program coordinator. Independent study under the guidance of an advisor in an area of mutual interest, such study terminating in a technical report of academic merit. Research may constitute a survey of a technical area in industrial engineering or operations research or involve the solution of an actual or hypothetical technical problem. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6695 - Independent Study I


    Prerequisite: consent of the program coordinator. Independent study under the guidance of an advisor in an area designated by the program coordinator. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6696 - Independent Study II


    A continuation of Independent Study I. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6698 - Thesis I


    Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student’s progress in the preparation of a thesis. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INDE 6699 - Thesis II


    A continuation of Thesis I. 3 credits.

International Business

  
  •  

    INTB 6643 - International Business


    An introduction to the political, economic, technological, and cultural settings of interntional business. Examines the problems, policies, and operational procedures of the multinational corporation, including adjustment to foreign cultures and governments. Review of development, organization, and structure of the international firm. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6644 - Managing in Global Markets


    This course provides the student with an understanding of the effects of globalization on the economic environment and corporate operations. It examines the multinational’s operations and the many adaptations management must undertake to interact successfully with the various global business environments. Topics will be examined from both domestic and international perspectives and will include the operational and strategic adjustments necessary for the multinational to navigate among the diverse and rapidly evolving cultural, political, economic, financial, operational, and ethical environments of global markets. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6645 - Comparative International Business Environments


    A comparative approach to the study of the noneconomic aspects of foreign markets of several representative areas in the world. Focus on the interaction between the sociocultural environment of host nations and the multinational firm. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6650 - International Business Negotiating


    Prerequisite: INTB 6643 .  A description and analysis of the various stages involved in the international business negotiating process. Also, a survey of the different types of values and behaviors encountered in business negotiating. Case studies of representative countries are included. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6662 - Political Economy of the European Union


    Prerequisite: ECON 6601 . This course reviews how the EU has evolved, and explores how political, economic, and social dimensions interact with each other. It examines the role of member-states and their interaction with the EU supranational bodies to assess implications at the national levels and their citizens. The EU represents the largest economic entity in the world, the largest trade power, and aid donor. It has emerged as a normative global actor though neither a state nor an international organization. It attempts to evaluate what it means for the world at a time when the EU finds itself at the core of an existentialism crisis. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6670 - Selected Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6690 - Research Project


    Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours and consent of the instructor. Independent study under the supervision of an advisor. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6693 - Internship


    Prerequisites: six credits of INTB concentration courses and consent of the internship coordinator. A program of field experience in selected organizations in international trade and marketing. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6695 - Independent Study I


    A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6696 - Independent Study II


    A continuation of Independent Study I. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6698 - Thesis I


    Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Periodic meetings and discussion of the individual student’s progress in the preparation of a thesis. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INTB 6699 - Thesis II


    A continuation of Thesis I. 3 credits.

Investigations

  
  •  

    INVS 6601 - White Collar Crime Analytics


    Students will apply analytic methods to financial and non-financial information to determine if red flags indicating potential fraudulent activity exist, or prioritize areas of concern where fraudulent activity may occur. Case study approach will be used to apply analytical models to organizations that have experienced fraudulent behavior. Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze various financial and non-financial information and prepare defendable positions on whether an organization may or may not have fraudulent activity occurring during the period under observation. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6602 - Contemporary Fraud Schemes


    In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to identify fraud schemes, the method(s) employed in perpetrating the fraud, the account(s) affected, and analytical procedures that could be used to identify specific fraudulent behavior. The concepts of the Fraud Triangle and Fraud Diamond will be examined with analysis of the components of each and how they relate to an investigation. Students will be able to identify personal traits and fact patterns that are key indicators for potential fraudulent activity. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6603 - Contemporary Topics in Money Laundering


    The course engages students in researching and evaluating current trends in money laundering, detection methods employed to uncover money laundering, and identifying preventive measures. Students will be exposed to international issues in money laundering, as well as the increasing presence of terrorist organizations, organized crime, and drug cartels in money laundering operations. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6604 - Contemporary Topics in Corporate Investigations


    This course will cover topics specific to employee law and rights, common issues in fraud examinations as internal security measures, and case studies of civil and criminal cases of internal investigations. Students will also cover the timing of calling in external investigators or law enforcement and how to document and collect evidence prior to calling in external investigators. Implications of pressing/not pressing charges are examined in light of various factors including organizational reputation. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6605 - Contemporary Topics in White Collar Crime


    Prerequisite: CJST 6630 . This course is an in-depth study of transactional evidence, laws, and evidence collection procedures used in various corporate and other financial investigations. The course expands upon the foundations of CJST 6630  and will use current case studies to examine contemporary issues in illegal activity and complexities of investigations. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6606 - Contemporary Topics in Security and Loss Prevention


    This course covers current topics in risk assessment and risk management as they relate to protection of intellectual property, human capital, property plant and equipment, financial assets/information, and technology. Other areas to be explored will include organized retail crime, cybercrime and cyber-enabled crimes. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6607 - Supervising and Managing the Investigative Unit and Process


    This course will provide the student with theoretical premises (concepts) that are coupled with practical applications, all geared toward increasing the effectiveness of the investigative unit. Students will analyze the issues relating to the role of patrol with investigations; classify the selection and promotion process for members of the investigative unit; identify how to develop and properly utilize an investigative plan; manage a confidential source program; manage and control investigative leads; design a sound confidential source program; and determine how to conduct a proper case review. Students will identify best practices in supervising people and managing the process. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6608 - Contemporary Topics in Civil Litigation


    This course will cover topics specific to civil litigation, including matrimony, valuation, hidden asset discovery, business loss, and other civil litigation matters. Students will research cases relating to civil litigation, and report on conflicting opinions by opposing parties, why there was a conflict, and conflict resolution methods. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6609 - Contemporary Topics in Dark Web Investigations


    This course will explore criminal offenses through the use of the dark web, and law enforcement’s efforts to combat those offenses. The course will focus on effective research methods to explore a criminal investigation regarding the offenses with the dark web. Transnational and organized crime activities in the dark web will also be explored. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6610 - Transnational and Organized Crime Investigations


    This course explores the internal and external mechanisms which support and foster international crime systems. Crime systems will be looked at via countries as well as continents. The form that crime takes transnationally will also be discussed along with the impact on investigations on a nationalistic level as well as global initiatives. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6611 - Contemporary Topics in Cybercrime Investigations


    This course will cover more advanced issues and cases in cybercrime. The course will also cover how cybercrime has evolved, and continues to evolve in the contemporary environment, and the impact cybercrime is having on developing laws related to criminal activity. Students will report on how investigations, detection, and protection have attempted to keep pace with fraudulent activity. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6612 - Contemporary Topics in Insurance Investigations


    A broad-based course covering contemporary issues in insurance fraud, including the dramatic increase in health insurance fraud. Case studies will include fraudulent insurance policies, employment benefit scams, arson for profit, false billing in health insurance, automobile accident scams, and other current fraudulent activities. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6613 - Banking Secrecy Act and Compliance Investigations


    This course covers current issues and changes in the Banking Secrecy Act (BSA), implementation of the requirements of the act, and analysis of compliance issues. Students will identify how to use BSA reporting requirements in combating money laundering, human trafficking and smuggling, drug trafficking, and other types of fraudulent activities. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6614 - Survey of Forensic Science


    An introductory survey of forensic sciences and criminalistics, crime scene procedures and documentation, and methods of laboratory analysis for all forensic science students. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6615 - Current Issues in Elder and Other Social Frauds


    This course covers topics in frauds against the elderly, non-occupational fraudulent activities (con artist-based frauds and scams), financial broker and Ponzi-based fraud, and other issues such as fraud committed to obtain financial assistance under illegal pretenses during states of emergency. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6616 - Topics in Special Investigations


    This course covers topics in federal background investigations, security clearance investigations, protective detail investigations, internal investigations, and other current issues. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6617 - Topics in Civil Rights Investigations


    This course covers investigations for civil rights violations from the criminal case investigative process and civil case investigative process. The course will focus on the history of civil rights cases. Recent cases in hate crimes, discrimination in housing or employment, and police-involved engagement with civilian minority groups will be used to assist in planning investigations. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6618 - Topics in Agency, Non-Profit and Government Fraud


    This course covers topics related to non-profits such as non-related business income for non-profits, improper expenditures and collection practices, and abuse of fiduciary duty. The course also focuses on government impropriety, bribery, corruption, procurement fraud, and contract fraud. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6619 - Topics in Intelligence Analytics


    This course will provide entry-level skills to new intelligence analysts working in a corporate security intelligence group. Successful graduates will be able to research, evaluate, and draw analytical conclusions in response to client needs. Topics include the intelligence cycle, methods of open source data collection, analysis, and professional written and oral briefing skills. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6620 - Title IX and Predator Investigations


    This course covers the various aspects of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, stalking, and sexual assault. Using case study and established laws, students will identify best practices for investigating alleged activities and evaluating deterrence/compliance plans. Compliance issues for the Cleary Act, Campus Save Act, and other topics will also be covered. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6621 - Cybercrime: from Counterfeiting to Digital Currency


    This course examines counterfeit currency, embezzlement, cyber enabled crime, check fraud, skimming, digital currency, and other related crimes.  The course will also focus on building collaborative cross-agency and cross-jurisdictional teams, taking a task force/working group approach. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6622 - Bribery and Corruption Investigations


    This course explores the national regulatory environment for bribery and corruption, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and other federal/state statutes, and the international regulatory environment, such as the UK Bribery Act 2010 and other international statutes. Students will identify potential red flags for bribery/corruption activity, identify the significant components of bribery/corruption, and develop a sound investigative plan. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6623 - Investigative Intricacies in Death Investigations


    A study of the differences between homicides, suicides, accidental, natural, and undetermined deaths. The course covers the processes from the initial investigative steps through the development of a multidisciplinary approach to the investigation of death. The understanding of how victimology and suspectology are important to the investigation will also be reviewed. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6624 - E-Discovery Investigations


    This course explores the rules of evidence as they relate to evidence discovery (digital evidence), and the processes by which e-evidence can be collected, maintained, and used in the investigative process. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6625 - Advanced Topics in E-Discovery Investigations


    Prerequisite: INVS 6624 . This course will explore, more in depth, the rules of evidence as they relate to evidence discovery (digital evidence), and the processes by which digital evidence can be collected, maintained, and used in the investigative process.  The course will build upon the foundations of evidence discovery and the investigative process. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6626 - Trafficking and Smuggling Investigations


    This course examines the investigation of the three main areas of trafficking and smuggling: human, drugs, and art and artifacts.  The course also explores current trends, shifts, and the international impact of trafficking and smuggling. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6627 - Identity Fraud Investigations


    This course examines identity theft investigations, specifically focusing on synthetic identity, credit card fraud, and stolen identity tax refund fraud. The course will examine how the frauds are perpetrated, how perpetrators launder their criminal proceeds, and where and how the perpetrators get compromised information. Current case studies will be analyzed. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6628 - Cold Case Investigations


    This course examines the critical aspects of cold cases and use of contemporary techniques in identifying potential avenues of investigations. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6629 - Evolving Trends of Financial and Cyber Crimes in an EMV World


    This course is a detailed examination of the current state of financial and cyber-enabled crimes in the United States. This will include traditional crimes like check kiting, card-cracking, Felony Lane Gang, and phishing, to the ever increasing threats of high-tech cyber-enabled criminal activity, such as point of sale (POS) network Intrusions, logical and physical attacks on ATMs, and gas pump & POS skimming to obtain the financial DNA of millions of victims. Students will also examine how the latest solution to combat access device fraud, EMV (Europay/Mastercard/Visa Chip Card) technology, will affect the future of cyber and financial crimes in the U.S.  Students will examine whether EMV technology can actually reduce criminal activity in the U.S. or just create a whole new set of problems for investigators. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6632 - Advanced Investigation I


    An in-depth study of modern principles and techniques of criminal and civil investigations. Management of investigations, use of witnesses, interviewing, polygraph, backgrounds, establishment of MO, missing persons, surveillance and investigation of questioned deaths and death scenes. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6633 - Advanced Investigation II


    An in-depth study of the principles and techniques of criminal and civil investigations. Investigation of fraud, embezzlement, white-collar crime, property crimes, sexual assaults and other crimes against persons; extortion; kidnapping; drug trades; and traffic accidents. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6634 - Criminal Tax Investigations


    This course examines the critical aspects of criminal tax investigations through case studies of money laundering, layering,structuring, unreported income, tax evasion, and other illegal activities.  3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6635 - Healthcare Fraud Investigations


    This course examines healthcare fraud and abuse, regulatory compliance, and transnational and organized crime activities in healthcare fraud.  Some of the important subject areas covered in the course include methods for investigating healthcare fraud and abuse, preventing and handling claim audits, compliance with the PPACA, HIPAA, and False Claims Act laws. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6636 - Internship


    Prerequisites: 6 graduate credit hours and consent of the program director are required to be enrolled in the internship class. The student’s formal educational development can be complemented by field placement experience in various investigation-related settings or agencies. Field experience will be supervised by designated agency and department personnel. One mid-semester report and one end of semester report are required. At the end of the semester in which internship credits will be obtained, a letter from the immediate internship supervisor evaluating the ability of the student to use techniques, skills and tools for the project, function on a team, communicate effectively, and understand the broad impact of the project should be obtained by the student and submitted to the program director by the last day of regular classes. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6637 - Anatomy of Healthcare Fraud


    This course examines the basics of the human anatomy, and the various “injuries” diagnosed and reported to healthcare providers. This is a non-science course related to how diagnoses of various ailments are used in healthcare fraud activities.  3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6638 - Electronic Files and Healthcare Fraud


    This course examines the complexities of Electronic Medical File fraud (EMF) - digital healthcare fraud. Students will research and learn how the transformation of files has affected healthcare providers, and how the failure to fully integrate systems can enhance fraudulent activity. Students will identify key fraud schemes in the electronic files of healthcare. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6639 - Global Perspectives of Multi-National Private Sector Security Operations


    This course will examine the required skills and methods to gain full situational awareness of global issues that impact private and public sector companies, both within the U.S. and its operations outside the U.S.  Students will be required to learn the principles and methods of identifying and achieving the security, risk management, and resiliencyobjectives of a multi-national private entity, and also put those principles and methods into practice through individual and group projects. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6640 - International Gambling, Fixing, and Corruption


    International sports betting is the largest segment of the sports betting world, and far exceeds the Las Vegas and European sports betting markets combined.  This course will engage students in the complexities of the international gambling arena, national and international crime rings, the volume of betting, the types of fixing that has been pervasive in sports activities and movements in the international markets. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6641 - Regulatory Compliance and Consumer Protection Investigations


    In this course, students will examine the complexities and significance of regulatory compliance and consumer protection requirements. Students will examine the relationship between an organization’s mission and operations relative to their impact on consumers and their inherent rights. Operational and internal controls will be explored as a tool to identify, assess, and address systematic weaknesses that may harm consumers who are involved with the organization. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of laws and regulations governing consumer protection and the major regulatory and enforcement agencies responsible for administering them. Students will research ethical and legal requirements as well as engaging in risks and controls assessment. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6642 - Financial Crimes and Economic Sanctions Analysis


    In this course, students will explore the role that anti-financial crimes measures and economic sanctions play under the umbrella of economic policies as well as their place within the overarching national security strategy. Students will analyze the relationship between combatting financial crimes at the tactical and operational level and their manifestation at the strategic level. Students will conduct economic sanctions analysis to establish goals, assess policy effectiveness and make recommendations for improvement. Legal and ethical requirements and limits will also be reviewed in the process. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    INVS 6690 - Contemporary Topics in Investigations


    Students enrolling in this course should be in the final semester of the program. The course covers current theories and practices in expert witness testifying, interview techniques, body language and verbal response analysis, case file documentation and report writing. Students will critically assess, analyze, synthesize, and report on the qualitative and quantitative data collected during the investigation that is easily understood by a jury. This is a capstone course. 3 credits.

Legal Studies

  
  •  

    LSTD 6620 - Regulation and Occupational Fraud


    In this course, students will study the complexities and the importance of internal control structures, ethical issues involved with internal controls, and legal requirements of recent laws designed to regulate corporate governance. Internal controls and governance will be examined as a tool to prevent/detect fraud through identification of red flags in the internal control framework. Students will develop the skills needed to identify, analyze, and research ethical and legal requirements and internal controls to prevent/regulate occupational fraud, pose defendable positions, and defend their answers. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LSTD 6640 - Litigation and Ethics for Forensic Accounting


    This course examines the role of forensic accountants in litigation from pre-lawsuit assessments through trial including investigation, evaluation, and discovery of accounting and financial information, expert reports, and presentation of evidence.  Professional standards for forensic accountants and legal rules governing ethical forensic accounting practices and testimony of experts as well as acquisition, retention, and use of accounting information will also be studied.  The course will include a combination of theory and practice. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LSTD 6641 - Professional Practice for Forensic Accounting


    Prerequisite: LSTD 6640 . Development and application of forensic and litigation advisory services, including forensic accounting consulting and expert witness skills.  The course will include a combination of theory and practice using simulated cases and mock trials.  Development of a forensic accounting professional practice will also be studied. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LSTD 6642 - Legal Issues in Litigation Support and Forensic Accounting


    Prerequisite: LSTD 6640 . This course will provide an overview of the different laws relevant to litigation support and forensic accounting.  With a focus on litigation support for private disputes, the course will study legal issues concerning infringement of intellectual property rights, employment law matters, privacy in electronic communications, securities regulation, Sarbanes Oxley Act requirements, international issues, and matrimonial and estate disputes. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LSTD 6643 - Fraud Schemes and the Law


    Prerequisite: LSTD 6640 . This course surveys the law governing various types of fraud, including elements of civil and criminal fraud, regulation of fraud, and methods for investigation and prevention in a legal context.  Students will study types of fraud, documents, sources of evidence, and analysis of internal and external fraud schemes with an emphasis on the skills needed to identify, investigate, and prevent fraud. 3 credits.

Logistics

  
  •  

    LGST 6660 - Logistics Technology and Management


    Survey of modern logistics activities in both the commerical and military sectors. Theory of integrated logistics systems with applications to include customer-supplier relationships, inventory management, just-in-time and related procurement disciplines, spares and customer field support, transportation, warehousing, and physical distribution management. Quantitative and e-commerce tools are decribed in the context of corporate enterprise resource planning and logistics management. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LGST 6663 - Logistics in Acquisition and Manufacturing


    Managing logistics processes in purchasing, acquisition, and manufacturing. Optimizing logistics in complex, worldwide supply chains; in distribution systems designed for multiproduct, multiplant organizations; and in single-plant systems producing for the end customer. Designing customer support strategies and multimodal transportation interfaces. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LGST 6665 - Integrated Logistics Support Analysis


    Concepts of integrated logistics support in both the commericial and military sectors including logistics specialties, customer support, documentation needs, internet applications, and system management on a worldwide basis. Introduction to reliability, maintainability, life cycle cost analysis, test and support capability, and warranty management. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LGST 6669 - Life Cycle Cost Analysis


    Theory and application of life cycle cost analysis applicable to both military and commercial decision support processes. Techniques for forecasting costs in future scenarios including economics of scale, upgrading, recycling, customer relationship support, training, and salvage and exit strategies. Application to new product development. Effectiveness over expected lifetime versus total life cycle cost. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LGST 6670 - Special Topics


    A study of selected issues of particular interest to students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LGST 6695 - Independent Study I


    A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    LGST 6696 - Independent Study II


    A continuation of Independent Study I. 3 credits.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11